Tuesday, October 07, 2014

Asparagus



Asparagus contains many anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as asparagus saponins and the flavonoids quercetin, rutin, laempferol and isorhamnetin, which all help to

combat arthritis, asthma, and autoimmune diseases.  Glutathione, found in asparagus, contains three amino acids (glumatic acid, glycine and cysteine) that combine into one molecule that serves as a powerful oxidation-reduction agent in our bodies.  Along with the antioxidants vitamin C, vitamin A (beta-carotene), zinc, manganese and selenium, the glutathione in asparagus fights against free radicals that cause aging and "cellular rust."  It is well-known that chronic inflammation and oxidation of the body's cells can lead to a variety of different cancers. With its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, asparagus is a robust fighter against bladder, breast, colon, lung, prostate, ovarian and other cancers.  The amino acid asparagine, found in asparagus, is an effective diuretic and has been historically used to treat swelling, arthritis, rheumatism, and PMS-related water retention.  Inulin, a carbohydrate in asparagus, encourages the growth of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, two bacteria that boost nutrient absorption, lower the risk of allergy and colon cancer, and help prevent unfriendly bacteria from taking hold in our intestinal tract.  Asparagus is also a good source of Vitamin K and C.


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Copyright 2015 Judie C. McMath and The Center for Unhindered Living

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